Payments

Australasian Plant Pathology Society

Plant Health is Earth's Wealth

     
Early Plant Pathology Photographs
     
   
  New Guinea - Scene in the laboratories at Keravat. Plant pathologist, L.B. Thrower, checking a pod for any sign of disease, while the agronomist in charge of the station, Mr. L.A. Bridgland looks on.  Date : 1955  
     
   
     
  Don Edwards, the senior plant pathologist at the Victoria Plant Research Institute, Melbourne, Mr David Harrison, examining a young potato plant grown from a stem cutting. With him are research assistants Mrs Cheryle Copes, centre and Miss Pauline Murray. 1974  
     
   
  Dr T P Kiely, District Plant Pathologist at the State Agricultural Station at Gosford, New South Wales, who was sent to Ceylon under the Colombo Plan in April, 1956 to investigate the decline in the citrus fruit industry. 1956  
     
   
  Kenneth Hutton, a plant pathologist with NSW Department of Agriculture, who discovers that phenyl mercuric chloride solution, controls black spot in apples.   
     
   
  WAITE Institute Adelaide 1972    

Back Row:  Bill Roberts, Peter Faber, Keith Jones, Maurice Carter, John Randles, Philip Price, Pat Talbot, ?, Colin Ryan, Richard Francki, Valdis Bumbieris, Nizar Mohamed, Roger Dennis, Nuredin Habili, Ali Rezaian Centre Row: Mark Carrol, Terry Feckner, Brian Stynes, Alan Dube, ?, Bruce Clare, ?, Alex Bainbridge, Allen Kerr, Sardar Moghal, ?, Masato Ikegami, Sitepu, Terry Price, Chris Grivell, Ralph Howells, Des Coleman Front Row: ?, ?, ?, ?, Tomasina Siekman,, Harry Wallace, Leona Mattner, Leah Wickman, Dorothy Coulter, Francis Reay, Kerrie Davies.
 
     
   
  Plant Pathology Branch Plant Pathologists in 1971 at opening of the new laboratories at Indooroopilly           

Front Row from left Ian Muirhead, John Alcorn, Bill Pont, John Harden, Ray Greber, Garth McCarthy, Ken Pegg, Helen Ogle, Bob Dodman, Melda Moffett Second Row: John Heaton, Bob Rees, Rob O'Brien, Lex Diatloff, Ron Peterson, Jack Aberdeen, Ian Hughes Back Row xx, Gordon Purss, Graham Wildermuth, Gordon Miles, Barry Conde, John Thompson, Keith Middleton 
 
     
   
  click image to enlarge    
CLOSURE OF BCRI, RYDALMERE AND RELOCATION OF HERBARIUM DAR
On 10 October, the NSW State Government announced the closure of the Biological and Chemical Research Institute, Rydalmere, as part of a number of measures to cut $28 million from the Department's operating budget over the next four years. This is in effect a 20 per cent cut which will apparently be achieved through volutary redundancy, natural attrition and efficiency gains. All staff located at Rydalmere (139 consolidated fund staff) will be relocated at up to 14 centres throughout the State. Many of these centres have been identified as 'key centres' of research which in some cases will be Cooperative Research Centres closely linked with regional Universities.
The Plant Pathology Herbarium (DAR) and the Entomology Insect and Mite Collections are to be relocated to the Agricultural Research and Veterinary Centre at Orange, on the central tablelands, about 270 km west of Sydney. The Department has given a verbal commitment to provide suitable and protected housing for both collections at Orange. A proposal for capital works funding for the collections is currently being sought in the next State budget due in May 1996. It is therefore unlikely that the Herbarium will be relocated before late 1996 although the Institute is to be closed in Feburary 1997. It appears that the statutory protection of the Herbarium, its status in the National reference Collections of Plant Pathogens and the recent construction using Commonwealth funds (three years ago!!!) of a brand new building for the Herbarium at Rydalmere have assisted in its survival. The replacement of Herbarium staff who do not relocate is a question that has to date not been answered.   (Michael Priest)
 
     
   
  This photograph was taken at a nematology workshop held at Mildura, Victoria, in 1975. Participants included some of the major contributors to plant and soil nematology in Australia [Max Sauer (3), Bob Colbran (5), Jack Meagher (6), Olga Goss (9), Harry Wallace (21), Alan Bird (22) and John Fisher (23)] together with some of the next generation of Australasian nematologists [Adrian Harris (1), Rob Brown (2), Chris O’Brien (4), Frances Reay (7), Frank Wood (8), Graham Stirling (10), Ray Akhurst (12), Janet McCulloch (13), Robin Bedding (14), Barry Thistlethwaite (15), Rod McLeod (16), Alan Dube (17), George Khair (18), Brian Stynes (19), Bob Banyer (20) and Roger Broadley (25)]. Also included are Sariah Meon (11), a student from Malaysia and Mike McClure (24), a visitor from the USA. Some technical staff and representatives of chemical companies were also present.